Category Archives: food history

Molding Americans: How Jell-O Advertising has Shaped (and Constrained) the Citizenry

Whether it is jiggling to hip hop music (JELLO) or soaking up alcohol before being devoured by college students (Jon), it would seem that Jell-O is a medium that simply absorbs and echoes the cultural fixations of its time. But … Continue reading

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From Celebration to Procrastination: Cakes and Creativity in the 1950s

Traditionally, cakes are emblematic of significant celebration. From first birthday cakes to wedding cakes and anniversary cakes, our lives are punctuated by celebratory baked goods. Part of this is due to the communal nature of cakes; they are intended to … Continue reading

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A Warm Convenience: How McDonald’s Sells Fast Food as Family Food

Food is never just food in our society, especially when it comes to our families. As consumers, we think about food selection, preparation, and serving as a physical representation of the love we feel for our family, a way to … Continue reading

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Sealed with a ‘Like’: Tupperware and Social Media

More than 60 years after its inception, Tupperware marketers are working hard to dispel what it says are dated perceptions of the brand (Cortese). Despite the fact that Tupperware products are still extremely successful – with a Tupperware party in … Continue reading

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Get Some Nuts: How Snickers Bars are Marketed as ‘Man-Candy’

Over the course of the past century, women have been the primary target for all types of food advertising (Parkin 151). This is particularly evident when looking at candy advertising, which has attempted to appeal to a seemingly special, supposed … Continue reading

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